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Fixed Flashing '88' problem!

anna
 

Thank you all for your help! 

Ossandust, it happens regardless of whether or not the MIDI cables are plugged in, so it looks like a defective RAM chip, ugh.

Chris, thanks for all the information on RAM vs the different ROMs! I saw your comment on my other thread as well (I was panicky haha) so I'll get back there, but unfortunately I got it used, so I think I'm going to have to ask one of my soldering friends to help... 

No worries, Michael, thanks for much for your help and best of luck with your fight against cancer!

Michael King
 

Correct Chris. I haven’t played with my 1010 in years. I think I misunderstood what the young lady was asking. Anyway...that’s what happens when you get old and fighting cancer. Thank you for reminding me of the difference. 

On Wed, Mar 4, 2020 at 9:29 AM chrisw_63 <chrisw_63@...> wrote:

Regarding Anna's question about EPROM vs. RAM, for general Info:
RAM stands for Random Access Memory.  It is typically 'volatile', meaning it loses all of it's information when you remove power from the chip.
ROM stands for Read Only Memory.  The original ROM chips were typically permanently programmed at the factory, could not be programmed by users, and were not erasable.
PROM is Programmable Read Only Memory.  User programmable with a "PROM Programmer" that uses a higher voltage (typically 12 v) to blow fuses that permanently program the memory chip.
EPROM is Erasable Programmable... you get the picture.  Also user programmable with a different programmer, these have a quartz window in the top so UV light can erase the chip and it can be reprogrammed.  It made PROM chips reusable, even though erasing them took up to 12 hours.  Many were designed to match the pinout of a PROM so they could be a drop-in replacement.
EEPROM is Electrically Erasable...  Sending the right signals to the pins of an EEPROM erases it so you can program it again.  Only takes a few seconds to erase.
In many cases, all of these are referred to as ROMs, and all but the plain ROM can be referred to as PROMs.  Most modern microprocessors have EEPROM built in, reducing the need for an external ROM chip of any kind.
The FCB1010 has One 256 KB EPROM that holds the Firmware, and one external 32 KB RAM chip, along with the 80C32 microprocessor that has it's own 256 bytes of RAM.

chrisw_63
 


Regarding Anna's question about EPROM vs. RAM, for general Info:
RAM stands for Random Access Memory.  It is typically 'volatile', meaning it loses all of it's information when you remove power from the chip.
ROM stands for Read Only Memory.  The original ROM chips were typically permanently programmed at the factory, could not be programmed by users, and were not erasable.
PROM is Programmable Read Only Memory.  User programmable with a "PROM Programmer" that uses a higher voltage (typically 12 v) to blow fuses that permanently program the memory chip.
EPROM is Erasable Programmable... you get the picture.  Also user programmable with a different programmer, these have a quartz window in the top so UV light can erase the chip and it can be reprogrammed.  It made PROM chips reusable, even though erasing them took up to 12 hours.  Many were designed to match the pinout of a PROM so they could be a drop-in replacement.
EEPROM is Electrically Erasable...  Sending the right signals to the pins of an EEPROM erases it so you can program it again.  Only takes a few seconds to erase.
In many cases, all of these are referred to as ROMs, and all but the plain ROM can be referred to as PROMs.  Most modern microprocessors have EEPROM built in, reducing the need for an external ROM chip of any kind.
The FCB1010 has One 256 KB EPROM that holds the Firmware, and one external 32 KB RAM chip, along with the 80C32 microprocessor that has it's own 256 bytes of RAM.

ossandust
 

There is some confusion possible when reading the replies, so here are the details : 
flashing 88 can have 2 possible causes : 
1. The original idea of the flashing 88 was to indicate that the RAM chip is defective. For that, the Behringer firmware writes to the RAM chip at startup, and reads back the data. If there is a difference, this indicates a RAM defect which is shown through a flashing "88" being displayed.
2. However there is a bug in the Behringer firmware : when a MIDI IN cable is connected, and MIDI data is being sent to the FCB1010 during startup, this data also ends up in the RAM and confuses the RAM test, resulting in a flashing "88".
Therefore, first thing to do is power on the FCB1010 with no cable connected to the MIDI IN. If you still have the flashing "88", it is a correct indication of a defective RAM, and the RAM chip needs to be replaced. This should preferably be done in a service centre, since it involves desoldering a small SMD device and soldering in the replacement part.  
If you only have the flashing 88 with a MIDI cable connected to the MIDI IN connector, it's just the firmware bug. It can be avoided by always unplugging the MIDI cable during startup, or it can be solved by upgrading the firmware to UnO, which has this bug corrected. Replacing the firmware means swapping the PROM chip (not the RAM or EEPROM). This is easy and can be done by anyone - as correctly described above by Michael King.

anna
 

Thank you! And apologies for the dumb follow-up question, but is the Eprom the same as the RAM chip? I guess I'm worried, since the o.p. put in the UnO chip and still had a flashing 88 issue, until replacing the other chip? Thanks!

Michael King
 

You can look up the instructions online. It’s pretty simple. You take off the bottom, and you’ll see the EEPROM Chip. It will have a paper tag on it. You very carefully pry the chip up. Moving around the chip so that it comes out as evenly as possible. Note the orientation on the Chip. It can be installed incorrectly. Take a picture of the chip before you remove it. That way you’ll have a reference when replacing the chip. Push the new chip down evenly, and make sure it’s seated properly. Good luck!!

On Tue, Mar 3, 2020 at 12:45 PM anna <meadorsanna@...> wrote:
(I realize this is probably hopeless asking 10 years later but...) I'd also like to know how you replaced the RAM chip! I have a brand new, completely useless unit and I'm very sad. :( :( 

anna
 

(I realize this is probably hopeless asking 10 years later but...) I'd also like to know how you replaced the RAM chip! I have a brand new, completely useless unit and I'm very sad. :( :( 

Jack
 

If I have midi in plugged when powering up 1010, I get '88' problem. If I plug midi in after powering up everything seems to work ok.

--- In fcb1010@..., "dudicus197923" <andrew.mccallister@...> wrote:

I'd also like to know more about how this. Seems like the solution to my issues also.

--- In fcb1010@..., Drop D <trixdropd@> wrote:

Any info on how you replaced the ram chip?

On Thu, Apr 1, 2010 at 1:59 PM, evansnigel16 <evansnigel16@> wrote:



Hi All,

Just thought I'd let everyone know that I have managed to solve the
flashing '88' issue. I installed Un0, thinking that might work, but the
flashing was still there and I couldn't get into global mode.

Having read somewhere that it was something to do with RAM tests on
startup, I replaced my RAM chip with a suitable one from another
manufacturer, and..........Bingo!

All working fine now. I hope this helps others who may have a 'bricked'
FCB1010.

Regards,
Nigel


Jack
 

My first post here, so be gentle.

I only had this '88' issue when my midi input was connected while powering up. Solution: first power up, then connect midi in.

I'm using original firmware and I haven't check the version, but it's at least 2.4.

--- In fcb1010@..., "dudicus197923" <andrew.mccallister@...> wrote:

I'd also like to know more about how this. Seems like the solution to my issues also.

--- In fcb1010@..., Drop D <trixdropd@> wrote:

Any info on how you replaced the ram chip?

On Thu, Apr 1, 2010 at 1:59 PM, evansnigel16 <evansnigel16@> wrote:



Hi All,

Just thought I'd let everyone know that I have managed to solve the
flashing '88' issue. I installed Un0, thinking that might work, but the
flashing was still there and I couldn't get into global mode.

Having read somewhere that it was something to do with RAM tests on
startup, I replaced my RAM chip with a suitable one from another
manufacturer, and..........Bingo!

All working fine now. I hope this helps others who may have a 'bricked'
FCB1010.

Regards,
Nigel


dudicus197923
 

I'd also like to know more about how this. Seems like the solution to my issues also.

--- In fcb1010@..., Drop D <trixdropd@...> wrote:

Any info on how you replaced the ram chip?

On Thu, Apr 1, 2010 at 1:59 PM, evansnigel16 <evansnigel16@...> wrote:



Hi All,

Just thought I'd let everyone know that I have managed to solve the
flashing '88' issue. I installed Un0, thinking that might work, but the
flashing was still there and I couldn't get into global mode.

Having read somewhere that it was something to do with RAM tests on
startup, I replaced my RAM chip with a suitable one from another
manufacturer, and..........Bingo!

All working fine now. I hope this helps others who may have a 'bricked'
FCB1010.

Regards,
Nigel


Drop D
 

Any info on how you replaced the ram chip?


On Thu, Apr 1, 2010 at 1:59 PM, evansnigel16 <evansnigel16@...> wrote:
 

Hi All,

Just thought I'd let everyone know that I have managed to solve the flashing '88' issue. I installed Un0, thinking that might work, but the flashing was still there and I couldn't get into global mode.

Having read somewhere that it was something to do with RAM tests on startup, I replaced my RAM chip with a suitable one from another manufacturer, and..........Bingo!

All working fine now. I hope this helps others who may have a 'bricked' FCB1010.

Regards,
Nigel


evansnigel16 <evansnigel16@...>
 

Hi All,

Just thought I'd let everyone know that I have managed to solve the flashing '88' issue. I installed Un0, thinking that might work, but the flashing was still there and I couldn't get into global mode.

Having read somewhere that it was something to do with RAM tests on startup, I replaced my RAM chip with a suitable one from another manufacturer, and..........Bingo!

All working fine now. I hope this helps others who may have a 'bricked' FCB1010.

Regards,
Nigel