Brand New FCB1010 240V model for sale


mangsong
 

I have a brand new, never used, FCB1010 240V unit for sale.  I ordered it on-line, and was sent the wrong voltage.  I ended up keeping it as the return postage was worth more the the device.  Now I have two.
This one comes with a UK IEC power cable, but will work almost anywhere in the 220V>240V world. (Note - A step down transformer may work, but I was warned off that approach.)
If anyone is interested and can use this unit, make me an offer.  I'm on Vancouver Island, BC, Canada, so shipping to parts afar is likely not going to be economical.


Joseph Mt <joseph_mt@...>
 

The stock FCB1010 comes with two voltage settings which you can change to suit your location.  Open up the FCB1010 and change the tap voltage settings to 110 volts internally without needing an external step-down transformer to do the same.  

On Tuesday, 5 October, 2021, 08:01:49 pm GMT-4, mangsong <mangsong@...> wrote:


I have a brand new, never used, FCB1010 240V unit for sale.  I ordered it on-line, and was sent the wrong voltage.  I ended up keeping it as the return postage was worth more the the device.  Now I have two.
This one comes with a UK IEC power cable, but will work almost anywhere in the 220V>240V world. (Note - A step down transformer may work, but I was warned off that approach.)
If anyone is interested and can use this unit, make me an offer.  I'm on Vancouver Island, BC, Canada, so shipping to parts afar is likely not going to be economical.


Jack Fenton
 

You will also need to change the fuse rating.  There is a different fuse rating for 110 v than 220 v.  I think you need to keep the wattage the same
so if the voltage is cut in half the fuse amperage rating should be doubled to ensure the same total wattage.  I think there is documentation somewhere on how to do this. I just don't remember where.


chrisw_63
 

Never increase a fuse rating unless the directions specifically tell you to do that.  In this case, you need look no further than the manual:


Jack Fenton
 

Yep, it looks like I was right. As I said, by decreasing the voltage by 1/2 you double the value of the fuse rating.  At 240 the rating is 50mA and at 120 the rating is 100mA. Simple electronics math. to maintain the same poer rating   P=I*E  where P = Power or Wats,  I is Amps and E is Voltage


mangsong
 

A local electrician noted the step up transformers do not alter the operating frequency - 50hz at 240V, vs 60hz at 120V.  Does the present an issue if the internal voltage is switched down to 120?


On Oct 6, 2021, at 8:51 PM, Jack Fenton via groups.io <jack_fenton@...> wrote:

Yep, it looks like I was right. As I said, by decreasing the voltage by 1/2 you double the value of the fuse rating.  At 240 the rating is 50mA and at 120 the rating is 100mA. Simple electronics math. to maintain the same poer rating   P=I*E  where P = Power or Wats,  I is Amps and E is Voltage


Joseph Mt <joseph_mt@...>
 

I have not had any problems after changing the internal voltage tap and my FCB1010 is fully functional for the last four years.   

On Thursday, 7 October, 2021, 12:00:31 am GMT-4, mangsong <mangsong@...> wrote:


A local electrician noted the step up transformers do not alter the operating frequency - 50hz at 240V, vs 60hz at 120V.  Does the present an issue if the internal voltage is switched down to 120?


On Oct 6, 2021, at 8:51 PM, Jack Fenton via groups.io <jack_fenton@...> wrote:

Yep, it looks like I was right. As I said, by decreasing the voltage by 1/2 you double the value of the fuse rating.  At 240 the rating is 50mA and at 120 the rating is 100mA. Simple electronics math. to maintain the same poer rating   P=I*E  where P = Power or Wats,  I is Amps and E is Voltage


Pmiller057
 

50Hz or 60Hz operation will make no difference. The transformer is designed to operate on either frequency at either voltage. The rest of the electronics inside after the transformer will not care either.


chrisw_63
 

Transformers are designed for a specific frequency - not so much the windings as the material and design of the core.  But the difference between 50 and 60 Hz isn't much, and since it has the ability to switch, the core would have been designed for both.  Insulation matters more in the voltage rating than anything else in it's design.  Like just about everything else it costs more to design and manufacture a different part for every different spec, so if they can just design it once and cover a whole area of specifications, that's what they do.  Most mains transformers will handle 50 or 60 Hz, and 120/240 volts without an issue.  (But always check the specs, just in case!)


Pmiller057
 

For a given power rating, a 50Hz transformer core will always be physically larger than a core needed for 60Hz operation. If a transformer is correctly designed for 50Hz operation, then it will happily operate at 60Hz. A transformer designed for 60Hz at used 50Hz may overheat depending on how the transformer is designed. Note, in the extract from the manual above, the FCB1010 is intended for 50Hz or 60Hz operation. Given the worldwide intended market and relatively low production volumes, it will most likely be more cost effective for the manufacturer to use the same transformer for all production. At final assembly and packing, the correct connections will be made and power lead packed as required for the destination marketplace. In today's world, a universal input (90-260V AC) switchmode power supply module would be much cheaper than the transformer supply used. A universal input power supply module will have no requirement to set correct input voltage connections at final assembly.


mangsong
 

Can anyone advise exactly where the voltage switch is located?  I have the 1010 open in front of me, but nothing obvious seems to be presenting itself.  Thanks.


mangsong
 

For those still following along (lol), I found this post: 

http://practicalusage.com/the-behringer-fcb1010-pedal-board/

"I opened my fcb that I bought in south America. So in the transformer you have Blue for 110V Red for 220V one of these will be disconnected depends of the voltage set in the factory (i.e.: like in my case, blue was disconnected, so red was connected cause the line in south was 220V, so I disconnect that red cable and connected the blue and everything worked perfect getting 9V AC at the yellow cables"

I found my 240V 1010 unit to be exactly as represented above, and followed the process.  I don't have a spare T100MA fuse (didn't want to risk blowing the one I have in my 120V 1010), but upon testing I'll report back with the results.
Thanks again for all the council.  Appreciated.